Blood Home > Asclera

Asclera is a drug approved for the treatment of two types of varicose veins. The drug is injected into the affected veins, where it eventually causes clotting, and scar tissue replaces the vein, which fades away. The medication's use is limited, so more than one treatment session may be required. Possible side effects include bruising, irritation, and pain.

What Is Asclera?

Asclera™ (polidocanol) is a prescription medication. It is used to treat spider veins and reticular veins (two common types of varicose veins). It is injected directly into the affected veins.
 
(Click Asclera Uses for more information on this topic, including possible off-label uses.)
 

Who Makes This Medication?

Asclera is manufactured by Chemische Fabrik Kreussler & Co. GmbH for BioForm Medical, Inc.
 

How Does Asclera Work?

Asclera belongs to a class of medications known as "sclerosing agents." It works by damaging the endothelium, the inside lining of blood vessels. This causes blood platelets to attach to the lining of the vessels; eventually, cellular debris and platelets cause the blood vessel to clot and be replaced by scar tissue. The vein will gradually fade over time.
 

When and How to Take Asclera

General considerations to keep in mind during treatment with Asclera include the following:
 
  • Your healthcare provider will inject this medication directly into the affected veins.
     
  • There is a limit to how much Asclera can be used per treatment; therefore, there is a limit to how many veins can be treated in a session. For people with extensive spider or reticular veins, more than one treatment session may be necessary.
     
  • Right after the injection, compression should be used, typically in the form of compression stockings or bandages. This should be continued for two to seven days (depending on the severity of the veins), or perhaps longer in more severe cases. Compression is necessary to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT).
     
  • Ask your healthcare provider if you will need thigh-high or knee-high compression stockings or support hose.
     
  • It is best if you can walk for 15 to 20 minutes after the treatment session and daily for a few days thereafter.
     
  • For two to three days after treatment, avoid heavy exercise, sunbathing, long plane flights, and hot baths or saunas.
     
  • Make sure your healthcare provider is adequately qualified for this type of treatment; careless or improper injection technique can lead to dangerous complications.
     
Written by/reviewed by:
Last reviewed by: Kristi Monson, PharmD;
Last updated/reviewed:
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